Pages

Saturday, October 30, 2010

The prize for your patience is a better photo

Please sit down and watch this! This is the price for the patience of some astrophotographers. The difference in S/N (signal-to-noise) ratio and the count of visible details is really noticable if you compare both Ha narrowband photos of NGC1893 in Auriga shown above. The first astrophoto is the result of an exposure of 960 seconds. The second one is a median stack of 5 x 960 seconds 2 x 600 seconds. It's incredible isn't it? The original high resolution picture can be found at https://files.me.com/xipteras/2ncnxf

Thursday, October 28, 2010

AstroDigital.Net on the Kindle

This is my homepage on the Kindle ebook reader of amazon.com. The Kindle is thin, light, portable and suitable to read ebooks. The 3G version is Internet capable.

Saturday, October 23, 2010

NGC2404 is a nebula in the galaxy NGC2403

This is an underexposed test photo of the galaxy NGC2403 in the Camelopardalis constellation. The integration ime was 3x3 minutes on each LRGB channel at f/3.6. It has been 2x digitally zoomed in MaximDL.
NGC2404 is a nebulous region in the external galaxy NGC2403. This faint object is located in the Camelopardalis constellation. The 3rd astrophoto shown above is one 16 minutes exposure at 385mm FL at f/3.6 using an SBIG ST-7XME NABG astrocamera under the light polluted skies. It has been digitally 2x zoomed with the software MaximDL. The spikes are overflowed pixels caused from bright stars due to the missing antiblooming gates of the used astrocamera.
--
See also:

Thursday, October 14, 2010

The autoguider settings in CCDSoft

These are the settings I am using for the system described in the categories below. You may also consult the CCDWare autoguider calculator to find out the proper settings for yours.

Monday, October 11, 2010

The double star 6Tri in Triangulum

This is the double star 6Tri in the Triangulum constellation. It is also called "TZ Tri" and it is 305 light years away from us. Amateur astronomers can identify two stars with a brightsness of 5.15 and 6.55 magnitudes and a separation of 4" arcseconds. It is well observed through an amateur telescope at a magnification of 200x. The photo above has been taken at 2415mm focal length and it has been digitally x2 zoomed.